How the political left views the wealthy summed up

Today’s Dilbert comic strip pretty much sums up how the left views the wealthy. Well, how they view businessmen who are wealthy. You see, they don’t hold the same animus toward athletes, music and movie stars that they do toward CEOs. It kind of tells you what they consider work worthy of its wages.

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Comments

  1. The left sells hate on a regular basis. Its easy to sell envy of others unger the notion that somehow they’ve taken it from the poor. However wealth creation in fiat money systems is always new money. And it creates jobs along with it. Stop listening to their nonsense.

    • Gary

      Ho does this happen though? Are poor people just stupid? I ask seriously. Democrats have been making promises to the poor and to minorities since LBJ and their condition has gotten worse with every promise.

      Obama made huge promises for the poor and middle class and not only failed to produce, he refused to produce.

      Why would the poor keep voting democrat if they never, NEVER have their lot in life improve? That’s what i could never understand.

      • I had to think hard over this. And while I can come up with several political strategies as to why it has come to this. I must confess to the simplest, we as human beings fall prey to coveting. We envy our neighbor, his wealth and goods and colectively we are fooled by the promise of socialism. Equal misery will not make us anymore happier as long as we live in envy of one another. The political class knows that selling us free stuff at someone else’s expense will never fail. I wish Christians would make more noise about this and maybe it would go away. As it’s been said, nobody votes against Christmas.

  2. the new liberty says:

    The super rich all too often get their by some degree of exploitation. But the whole system is flawed. The rich get richer and the poor get poorer. The wage gap truly is absurd, but the whole system is screwed. This isn’t a left v. right thing though, it’s America’s legacy of corporate exploitation and can only be seen clearly when treated as such

    • The rich get rich because they make good business decisions. The poor get poor because they make poor financial decisions. Bottom line.

      The decrying the wage gap doesn’t consider the kind of work and responsibilities and education required and training required. You can’t hire the pizza boy off the street to run a Fortune 500 company successfully.

    • Liberty’s right, John. The evil rich make their dough by enticing consumers with their better products and lower prices, those evil bastards. Such exploitation!

      I especially like this part:

      “…it’s America’s legacy of corporate exploitation and can only be seen clearly when treated as such.”

      …which sounds to me as nothing more that proceeding based on preconceived notions rather than on determining the real cause of whatever is being blamed on businessmen. It’s when you treat someone like a crook that you can plainly see he is a crook. Perfect.

      • the new liberty says:

        Haha. If I ever make faulty points and can count on folks like you to rip me apart. Yeah. I speak from the perspective which sees the majority of U.S industry on the backs of slaves for its first 200 years, and systematic exploitation through peonage, convict leasing, and exploitative share cropping agreements which went on for a hundred years after slavery. I also see the exploitation of kids. I see corrupt banking and business practices, like the ones that caused the great depression. But I guess I’m seeing from a more sensitive perspective. I see land stolen and lives sacrificed for the advancement of corrupt people. I don’t hate the rich. I’ve never been rich. But you, you have some weird protective compulsion for them, and not being apart of the 1%, that makes you one of their foot soldiers, their pawns.
        I speak from history

        • The large majority of millionaires in America are self made, not inherited. I think the problem is that you’re holding people today liable for practices that ended even before their grandparents were born.

          Slavery did build wealth, but there nor many people around now who still have slavery wealth.

          Some businesses use legal means to earn the highest amount of profit, but so do you and I. We don’t pay more than sticker price for any item or service, in face we look for things like coupons and sales and negotiations to lower our outlay and maximize out capital. We can’t get mad at a business or corporation that does the same thing, but a larger scale.

          • the new liberty says:

            I’m not mad at rich people or wealthy people. I’m mad at poor bashing when minimum wage in most places cannot compensate for the cost of living. I am fortunate to live in Ohio, one of the best states where economics is concerned, but I am aware that it is not so great in many places in the U.S
            I’m mad at a system that is exploitative by nature. I understand the system. I understand corporations want to make 500% profit. I understand what they do to achieve that goal.
            I am not persuaded that the exploitative practices done just 60 years ago have all simple waned in the wake of a more moral more fair society. Nor am I persuaded to think that the top one percent did not inherit some portion of their wealth. I’m don’t think you actually understand the difference in wealth between the middle class and the 1%. Look at this link (http://billmoyers.com/2013/09/20/by-the-numbers-the-incredibly-shrinking-american-middle-class/) to have a snapshot of what the wealth disparity really looks like in the U.S.

            • The fact that is a disparity doesn’t follow that it is unethical that it exists.

              I’m not wealthy. I’m paycheck to paycheck. If a financial crisis happened in my home I’d be screwed. You call it “poor bashing”, but I call it a description of reality. People are in their lot in life because of their decisions. I can look back at my life and see every decision that had a ripple effect on my current financial status, and I could have done otherwise. As we speak, I could be doing something different, but for one reason (excuse) or another, I keep the status quo. But it my choices that have gotten me where I am.

              But minimum wage was never intended to be used to support a household. And the vast majority of people on min wage aren’t using it for that. Now, I don’t get my opinion from Internet memes, but if someone has minimum education, skills, and training, doesn’t it follow that they’d make a minimum wage? Instead of asking why they only make min wage, ask why they are only qualified to make min wage in the first place.

              • the new liberty says:

                The “self made man” you speak of simply doesn’t exist. It is a false description of reality to say that people are poor simply because of their decisions. It is a far too general description. I know for a fact that immoral choices have helped the one percent as history testifies.
                Your equation of knowledge equals qualification and qualification equals good economic standing doesn’t translate to reality when people with masters care unemployed or underemployed working at McDonald’s. Your faith in capitalism is misplaced.
                The truth is the average hardworking American can just barely meet the cost of living and that is because of the economic situation handed to them, passed down from previous generations.

              • http://www.fa-mag.com/news/most-millionaires-self-made–study-says-14565.html

                Again, most millionaires are self made, 2/3. Only 8% inherited.

                Your displeasure at “the system” is misplaced. You don’t place enough stock in personal responsibility.

              • the new liberty says:

                You place far too much. The “system” is our monetary system, our banking system, our corporate system, and our labor system

              • the new liberty says:

                No one is purely “self made,” i.e “autonomous.”

  3. paynehollow says:

    John…

    Are poor people just stupid? I ask seriously.

    Seriously? If you are asking that question seriously, then I know who is the stupid one.

    Since black folk vote for Dems overwhelmingly, are you also asking “seriously” if black people are just stupid?

    Do you not see how stupid the question is and racially offensive the question is? I know, I know, you did not bring up race. But you brought up the suggestion that people voting for the Dems = stupid and since black folk overwhelmingly do so, there is the implication there. Do you not consider things like that when you make comments?

    And to schluff off income differences to a simple blame or credit of the individuals is just naive. Policies make a difference, in addition to personal choices. Education, background, region, parenting, etc, all make a difference. It’s simply not all a matter of blaming the victim.

    One man’s opinion.

    ~Dan

    • “Seriously? If you are asking that question seriously, then I know who is the stupid one.”

      That would be you, Dan. And hypocritically so given your recent scolding over pointing out the stupidity of a question. John clearly referred to the problems caused by the people poor people so often support. And yes, even black people think black people are stupid for supporting Democrats. What other possibility would you suggest regarding someone who consistently supports those who consistently let him down? Brilliant?

      We’ve had this discussion more than once regarding “the choices of the poor” versus “they’re poor because they’re victims”. You failed to offer anything that supports your position. Even the most deprived (deprived of whatever you think is the most critical in a deprived person’s impoverished state) still has the choice of either maintaining the status quo or striving to overcome. It is ALWAYS choice. If we are “blaming the victim”, it is because we know the victim is a victim only of his own choices in life.

      One man’s far superior opinion, because it’s based on reality and not wussie emotion.

      • Piggy backing on what Marshall said, I just snapped a pic on someone’s hallway for dan. It is a house I deliver multiple gov subsidy checks to. The hallway is filled with empty cases of alcohol. What, Dan, do you need to be convinced that it’s a person’s choices that land them where they are, and not because they are being exploited and held down.

  4. paynehollow says:

    What? You have proof that SOME people make bad choices??!! EGAD! You’ve proven that all poor folk are stupid and lazy!

    Well done! Get that picture straight to the Reagan library, man, before Obama’s Secret Police come and kill you!

    • That’s how I expect you to react. My point is that I see it all day throughout the neighborhoods I’m in. You refuse to accept it and dismiss it as anecdotal. The problem is that when it’s prevalent, it’s not anecdotal. You extend the benefit of the doubt to the poor so much that your ideology and suggest action, and willingness to overlook the problems actually harms them.

  5. paynehollow says:

    And I see hard working poor folk everyday in the urban streets I walk every day and in my church community, where we work with the very poor and challenged.

    I also see folk (rich and poor) who are lazy.

    If you are ONLY seeing “lazy poor folk” when, in reality, all sorts of poor folk exist, it makes me question your reasoning and your biases. The thing is, you don’t know these people, you don’t know their situations. You are taking a quick glimpse at a small set of details and generalizing out an irrational conclusion, one that appears to be based on a bias against poor folk.

    John…

    The problem is that when it’s prevalent, it’s not anecdotal.

    No, John, you are factually mistaken. Your TINY, MINISCULE, 1/10th of an inch deep “experience” does NOT make it “not anecdotal.” It is EXACTLY anecdotal.

    Go, work with the poor, the homeless, the mentally ill, and do so every day. Do it for 28 years, as my wife has in her role as a social worker.

    THEN, go and read the peer-reviewed research. Take some classes, conduct some actual studies.

    THEN and only then, come back to me with your anecdotal evidence.

    As it is, I don’t care that you walk through poor neighborhoods and get a fleeting glimpse of one fragment of one segment of a tiny minority of poor folks’ lives. I am not impressed. It is dog excrement on the bottom of my shoe.

    John…

    You extend the benefit of the doubt to the poor so much that your ideology and suggest action, and willingness to overlook the problems actually harms them.

    What problems do you think I’m overlooking? What do you know about my dealings with the poor? You are worse than any poor person I know. You take a TINY bit of information and then you LAZILY extrapolate out ridiculous guesses based on your farts after a bad burrito.

    I’m sorry so rough on you, John, but this is just stupid and arrogant.

    Get serious if you want to talk about serious topics.

    ~Dan

    • Which of these does not fit the discussion:

      …the poor, the homeless, the mentally ill,…”

      To group these three together in an effort to dispute John’s point is dishonest. I don’t see where John has referred to the homeless or mentally ill. The latter is a separate issue altogether, and the homeless too often comprise the mentally ill, so is also not at issue here. A little honesty is always a good thing, but total honesty does not serve Dan well in maintaining his posture regarding any issue.

      Indeed, like Ark, Dan will only regard studies and experiences that reflect his preferred belief. It is deceitful to dismiss John’s experiences and to inflate the validity of one’s own. What’s more, Dan’s perceptions are so often questionable to begin with, and never take into account what is clearly visible to those without an agenda. Still further, Dan has not once provided any evidence to suggest that the poor are victims of circumstances beyond their ability to alter.

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